Category Archives: Teaching

Program for the CTW/ATC 2017 in Paris

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The provisory program for the Critical Theory Workshop / Atelier de Théorie Critique, which is an intensive research collaborative that I run in Paris over the summer, has been set. Click here to read in full. The list of invited guests includes Marielle MacéPatrice ManiglierPeter Skafish, Philippe CorcuffSophie WahnichAlice Canabate, Marie Goupy, Jennifer Ponce de LeónJean-François BayartAndrew FeenbergBernard Stiegler and Özgür Gürsoy. Participants in this year’s workshop come from approximately 12 different disciplines and 15 cultural backgrounds. Click here to read their profiles.

A Different Kind of Introduction to Philosophy

Here is a copy of my syllabus for Introduction to Philosophy, whose goals are outlined in the overview below. Comments are welcome: gabriel.rockhill@gmail.com

Overview

Drawing on an array of texts that surpass the standard ‘Western’ canon, this course will grapple with some of the most expansive and intimidating philosophic questions: What is the meaning of life? What is the nature of reality? Who are we? What—if anything—can we know? What is philosophy itself, and how might it help to elucidate some of these questions? In each case, we will approach these issues from multiple and diverse perspectives, often reframing or displacing them in order to reveal hidden philosophic assumptions.

Rather than seeking to find definitive closure or unanimous consensus, this seminar will cultivate a process of open-ended collective inquiry in which students will be encouraged to think autonomously and challenge facile solutions. The material covered will include ancient, Christian, modern and contemporary sources, as well as texts from beyond the canonized—and largely white, male, middle-class, European—history of philosophy. This will allow us to critically reflect on the deep-seated presuppositions of particular cultural traditions, while engaging with radically different practices of philosophic interrogation. Students should come away from the course with an expanded sense of theoretical possibilities, as well as an arsenal of critical tools for developing creative and rigorous thinking.