Category Archives: Publications

Artículo traducido al español

Me siento honrado de que uno de mis artículos recientes, “El poli bueno y el poli malo del capitalismo,” se haya traducido al español para Rebelión. Haga clic aquí para leerlo. Extracto: “El análisis materialista demuestra que liberalismo y fascismo, al contrario de lo que mantiene la ideología dominante, no son opuestos; son socios dentro del sistema capitalista criminal.” Haga clic aquí para leer más.

Artículo sobre el fascismo traducido al español

Me siento muy honrado de que uno de mis artículos recientes sobre el fascismo se haya traducido al español para Rebelión. Haga clic aquí para leerlo. Extracto: “El concepto burgués de fascismo pretende singularizarlo como un fenómeno idiosincrático, en gran parte o completamente superestructural, con el fin de imposibilitar cualquier examen de su ubicua presencia en la historia del orden capitalista mundial. Por el contrario, el enfoque materialista histórico propone un análisis a múltiples escalas de la totalidad social con el fin de demostrar que es más adecuado entender la coyuntura específica del fascismo europeo de entreguerras como un fenómeno enmarcado dentro de una fase estructural de la guerra de clases capitalista y, en último término, de la historia sistémica del capital, que vino al mundo –en palabras usadas por Karl Marx para describir la acumulación primitiva– “exudando sangre y mugre por todos los poros, de la cabeza a los pies”.” Haga clic aquí para leer más.

Uno de mis artículos sobre el fascismo fue traducido al español

Tuve el honor de tener uno de mis artículos recientes sobre el fascismo traducido al español por Robert Avecino y publicado en Rebélion (agradecimiento especial a Greg Wilpert por la recomendación): “El verdadero legado de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, lejos de ser el de un orden mundial liberal que había derrotado al fascismo, es el de una verdadera internacional fascista desarrollada bajo la cobertura liberal para intentar destruir a quienes realmente habían luchado y ganado la guerra contra el fascismo: los comunistas.”

Interviewed for Article in Norwegian on My Critique of Foucault

I was honored to be interviewed for this article in Norwegian regarding my recent piece “Foucault: The Faux Radical“: “Foucault was one of these theorists who spearheaded the development of a kind of ‘linguistic pyrotechnics.’ In the deployment of jargon and intricate concepts, an endless theoretical sea of ​​fog arises. Seemingly radical, but without substance, says Rockhill. He goes on to talk about how this tradition has become entrenched in American universities and cites theorists such as Judith Butler and Wendy Brown as examples of academics who have followed in Foucault’s footsteps. And although there are many other well-known theorists in the French intellectual tradition Rockhill criticizes, such as Jacques Derrida and Jean-François Lyotard, there is no doubt why he focuses on Foucault: – ‘As I see it, Foucault is more dangerous than the others. Since he has been cultivated as a radical thinker, it is more difficult to see his reactionary sides.'”

“Liberalism & Fascism: The Good Cop & Bad Cop of Capitalism” — Article in Black Agenda Report

My latest article was just published here in Black Agenda Report. It is part four of a four-part series entitled “Fascism: A Counter-History.” The first part is available here, the second here, and the third here.

Excerpt: “Historically, liberalism and fascism, in this broad sense, have functioned as two modes of capitalist governance that operate in conjunction with one another, following the logic of the police interrogation tactic known as good cop / bad cop. Liberalism, as the good cop, promises freedom, the rule of law and the protection of a benefactor state in exchange for acquiescence to capitalist socioeconomic relations and pseudo-democracy. It tends to both serve and attract members of the middle and upper-middle classes, as well as those who aspire to be part of them. The bad cop of fascism has proven particularly useful for governing those populations that are poor, racialized, and discontent, as well as for intervening in various parts of the world to impose capitalist social relations by force. If people are not hoodwinked by the false promises of the good cop, or they are not motivated by other reasons to be acquiescent, then the liberals’ partner in crime is on call to beat them into compliance. Those who rise up from any class in order to contest capitalism should be ready to have the liberals and their supposed regime of rights tap out, ceding the fight to their more vicious ally while looking the other way, and reminding any onlookers of the important differences between the lesser of two evils.”

“The U.S. Did Not Defeat Fascism in WWII, It Discretely Internationalized It” — Article in CounterPunch

My latest article was just published here in CounterPunch. It is part three of a four-part series entitled “Fascism: A Counter-History.” The first part is available here, and the second here. Excerpt: “To establish itself as the global military hegemon and international guard dog of capitalism, the U.S. government and National Security State have relied on the help of the significant number of Nazis and fascists it integrated into its global network of repression, including the 1,600 Nazis brought into the U.S. through Operation Paperclip, the 4,000 or so integrated into the Gehlen organization, the tens or even hundreds of thousands that were reintegrated into the ‘postwar’—or rather transwar—regimes in fascist countries, the large number who were given free passage to Empire’s backyard—Latin America—and elsewhere, as well as the thousands or tens of thousands integrated into NATO’s secret stay-behind armies. This global network of seasoned anti-communist assassins has also been used to train armies of terrorists around the world to participate in dirty wars, coups d’état, destabilization efforts, sabotage, and terror campaigns.” [read more]

https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/10/16/the-u-s-did-not-defeat-fascism-in-wwii-it-discretely-internationalized-it/

“Liberalism and Fascism: Partners in Crime” — Article in CounterPunch

My latest article was just published here in CounterPunch. It is part two of a series I’ve written on fascism (the first part is available here). Excerpt: “Given the ways in which the current public debate on fascism tends to be framed in relationship to purported liberal resistance, there could scarcely be a timelier task than that of scrupulously re-examining the historical record of actually existing liberalism and fascism. As we shall see even in this brief overview, far from being enemies, they have been—sometimes subtle, sometimes forthright—partners in capitalist crime.”

“Fascism: Now You See It, Now You Don’t!” — Article in CounterPunch

My latest article, which is part of a series I’ve written that proposes a counter-history of fascism, was just published here in CounterPunch. Excerpt: “The bourgeois concept of fascism seeks to singularize it as an idiosyncratic phenomenon, which is largely or entirely superstructural, in order to foreclose any examination of its ubiquitous presence within the history of the capitalist world order. In contrast, the historical materialist approach proposes a multi-scalar analysis of the social totality in order to demonstrate how the conjunctural specificity of interwar European fascism can best be understood as nested within a structural phase of capitalist class warfare, and ultimately within the systemic history of capital, which came into the world—in the words used by Karl Marx to describe primitive accumulation—’dripping from head to toe, from every pore, with blood and dirt.'” [read more]

“Foucault: The Faux Radical” — Article in LARB

My latest article examines the material history of Foucault’s relationship to revolutionary politics. Excerpt: “The contradiction that I would like to elucidate is that of the radical recuperator, meaning the intellectual who appears radical in certain circles but whose primary social function is to recuperate truly radical critique within the extant system, thereby policing the left border of critique. What interests me first and foremost, then, is how Foucault’s work—like that of other French theorists, but often with more political panache and historical flair than Derrida, Deleuze, Lacan, and co.—has played an important role in a much larger historical reconfiguration: the great ideological realignment of the Western intelligentsia, which took a gradual but decisive step to the right by distancing itself from anti-capitalist revolutionary politics. In order to see how this process unfolded in the case of Foucault, which of course involved myriad forces and was nowise due to him alone, it will be helpful to lay out and contextualize the evolution of his mercurial politics. This will allow us to bring to the fore a clear pattern and identify the man behind the many masks.” [read more]